One of the best Xkcd evergreens:

Fortunately, the charging one has been solved now that we’ve all standardized on mini-USB. Or is it micro-USB? Shit.

Somehow, I never liked GetOpt. I am not convinced by all details of GFlags as well. But, it is the better option than whipping up some CmdLine parser myself.

For the nuget package I focused only on the thread-safe static library. If you need another variant, feel free to reuse my AppVeyor artifacts. Those include basically everything.

As usual, the package code is free: https://bitbucket.org/sgrottel_nuget/gflags_nuget

I had a nice opportunity to visit academia again. Colleagues from the old times at the university were organizing a workshop at this years EGEV 2020, the VisGap 2020 — The Gap between Visualization Research and Visualization Software — and they invited me to give a cap stone presentation. I was honored by the invite, and luckily, my company agreed to my participation as well.

Now, with our current COVID-19 situation, the conference and the workshop did not take place in Norrköping in Sweden as planned. Instead the whole conference and all workshops were converted to virtual events. As a result attendance was free. And, all sessions are freely available on YouTube. So, if you like to see my talk, be my guest:

Yes, I am still using AntTweakBar. As you might know, the development of AntTweakBar is discontinued. At some point in the future, I will switch. Currently, I consider imgui the best successor. But I haven’t had time to look into imgui. So, when I resurrected an old small tool of mine, it still used ATB, and I did not want to recode all of this. But out of “because-I-can,” I decided  to update all dependencies to their newest versions. As a result the ATB integration with GLFW 3 did not work any longer. A couple of callback functions where changed between GLFW 2 and GLFW 3. I ended up rewriting my glue code between those two libraries.

Here it is, if any of you ever come across the same issue. First the callbacks:

static void keyCallback(GLFWwindow* window, int key, int scancode, int action, int mods)
{
#ifdef HAS_ANTTWEAK_BAR
  if (action == GLFW_PRESS || action == GLFW_REPEAT)
  {
    int twMod = 0;
    bool ctrl;
    if (mods & GLFW_MOD_SHIFT) twMod |= TW_KMOD_SHIFT;
    if (ctrl = (mods & GLFW_MOD_CONTROL)) twMod |= TW_KMOD_CTRL;
    if (mods & GLFW_MOD_ALT) twMod |= TW_KMOD_ALT;

    int twKey = 0;
    switch (key)
    {
    case GLFW_KEY_BACKSPACE: twKey = TW_KEY_BACKSPACE; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_TAB: twKey = TW_KEY_TAB; break;
    //case GLFW_KEY_???: twKey = TW_KEY_CLEAR; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_ENTER: twKey = TW_KEY_RETURN; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_PAUSE: twKey = TW_KEY_PAUSE; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_ESCAPE: twKey = TW_KEY_ESCAPE; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_SPACE: twKey = TW_KEY_SPACE; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_DELETE: twKey = TW_KEY_DELETE; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_UP: twKey = TW_KEY_UP; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_DOWN: twKey = TW_KEY_DOWN; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_RIGHT: twKey = TW_KEY_RIGHT; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_LEFT: twKey = TW_KEY_LEFT; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_INSERT: twKey = TW_KEY_INSERT; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_HOME: twKey = TW_KEY_HOME; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_END: twKey = TW_KEY_END; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_PAGE_UP: twKey = TW_KEY_PAGE_UP; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_PAGE_DOWN: twKey = TW_KEY_PAGE_DOWN; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_F1: twKey = TW_KEY_F1; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_F2: twKey = TW_KEY_F2; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_F3: twKey = TW_KEY_F3; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_F4: twKey = TW_KEY_F4; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_F5: twKey = TW_KEY_F5; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_F6: twKey = TW_KEY_F6; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_F7: twKey = TW_KEY_F7; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_F8: twKey = TW_KEY_F8; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_F9: twKey = TW_KEY_F9; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_F10: twKey = TW_KEY_F10; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_F11: twKey = TW_KEY_F11; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_F12: twKey = TW_KEY_F12; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_F13: twKey = TW_KEY_F13; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_F14: twKey = TW_KEY_F14; break;
    case GLFW_KEY_F15: twKey = TW_KEY_F15; break;
    }
    if (twKey == 0 && ctrl && key < 128)
    {
      twKey = key;
    }
    if (twKey != 0)
    {
      if (::TwKeyPressed(twKey, twMod)) return;
    }
  }
#endif
}

static void charCallback(GLFWwindow* window, unsigned int key)
{
#ifdef HAS_ANTTWEAK_BAR
  if (::TwKeyPressed(key, 0)) return;
#endif
}

static void mousebuttonCallback(GLFWwindow* window, int button, int action, int mods)
{
#ifdef HAS_ANTTWEAK_BAR
  if (::TwEventMouseButtonGLFW(button, action)) return;
#endif
}

static void mousePosCallback(GLFWwindow* window, double xpos, double ypos)
{
#ifdef HAS_ANTTWEAK_BAR
  if (::TwEventMousePosGLFW((int)xpos, (int)ypos)) return;
#endif
}

static void mouseScrollCallback(GLFWwindow* window, double xoffset, double yoffset)
{
#ifdef HAS_ANTTWEAK_BAR
  static double pos = 0;
  pos += yoffset;
  if (::TwEventMouseWheelGLFW((int)pos)) return;
#endif
}

static void resizeCallback(GLFWwindow* window, int width, int height)
{
#ifdef HAS_ANTTWEAK_BAR
  ::TwWindowSize(width, height);
#endif
}

Of course, you can omit the #ifdefs if you don’t care. Add your own codes to the functions after ATB has been handled.

Then, it’s just your typical initialization of GLFW callbacks:

::glfwSetKeyCallback(window, keyCallback);
::glfwSetCharCallback(window, charCallback);
::glfwSetMouseButtonCallback(window, mousebuttonCallback);
::glfwSetCursorPosCallback(window, mousePosCallback);
::glfwSetScrollCallback(window, mouseScrollCallback);
::glfwSetWindowSizeCallback(window, resizeCallback);

Even the powerful, tart Granny Smith cultivar is proving ineffective against new Gran-negative doctors.

Yes, goofy. But, I had a good laugh. In fact, re-reading it while posting here … I was giggling the whole time. Silly. And, at the same time, it might be the vicious satire in a long time.

Some while ago, two of my colleagues were putting effort into our main code base and build system, to migrate to Visual Studio 2017, and the C++17 standard. Admirable and sensible. Of course, that was reason enough for another colleague of mine and myself to joke around about downgrading our code base to C++03 or C++98 or maybe even downright to C. Don’t worry, we all four were laughing. (Or were we?)

At that time, my joke-buddy pointed me to a blog post by aras-p about Modern C++ Lamentations. Read it! It’s worth it. And don’t go, “that’s maybe in gaming industry. Doesn’t apply to my work.” Well, I am not working in gaming industry. You know what: It does apply to my work pretty much 100%.

In my opinion, “modern” C++ is too complex, too bloated, too much of a poser for “look I can do cool code”, and misses the point of solving problems.

[…] to me this feels like someone decided that “Perl is clearly too readable, but Brainfuck is too unreadable, let’s aim for somewhere in the middle”.

Many language features are valid, other as just “cool.” Now, of course, I understand, that different people will find different parts of the language good. There are some aspects, however, which are objectively bad. Look at compile times and debug times mentioned in this article. At least those make a very valid point.

C++ compilation times have been a source of pain in every non-trivial-size codebase I’ve worked on. […] Yet it feels like the C++ community at large pretends that is not an issue, with each revision of the language putting even more stuff into header files, and even more stuff into templated code that has to live in header files.

I have been a hobby programmer in school; was a part time programmer while being a student of software engineering; made my Ph.D. in computer science on computer graphics and visualization, while writing a large-scale modular, high-performance visualization software; worked as senior software developer in a company; and I am now manager of a team of software engineers. I think it is valid to say, I have been programming almost my whole life. I still try to do some minor improvements or bug fixes, even as a manager. Most likely me team is thinking I should stop messing in “their code.” I won’t. My point is:

I have been programming almost my whole life. And I did it in more than a dozen different programming languages. (While writing this I counted 15, not including scripting languages. But most likely I forgot some.) Given this experience, let me say this:

C++ is not the best programming language. In modern C++ not everything has improved.

Please! Start (again) thinking “How do I solve this problem,” and not “How do I solve this problem with variadic templates wrapped in lambdas with ranges because they are so cool.”

While I was lecturing at the university on C++ for computer graphics, clear as daylight, you can see the different types of uprising programmers. And there is this specific sub-type of “programming artists.” Programmers, who think their source code is art and above and beyond trivial programs others do. I will not comment on those any further. But I noticed, in the field where C++ is used, especially so-called modern C++, those guys are seen pretty often! Sad.

As a closing note: Nowadays, when I start a project and think about which programming language(s) to use, C++ is not on the top of the list anymore.