Most new data sets for my scientific visualization find their way to my desk in form of arbitrarily structures text files. This is not really a problem. The first sensible step is converting them into a fast binary format for the visual analysis. With this, however, I face the problem of understanding the structure of 11 Gigabytes text files (no exaggeration here!). But, such files do have structure. So, only the few first and few last lines really matter. The bits in-between will be roughly the same way. What I need are the Linux-known commands “head” and “tail”. However, I am a Windows guy. So? The Powershell comes to the rescue:

gc log.txt | select -first 10 # head
gc log.txt | select -last 10 # tail

I found these on: http://stackoverflow.com/a/9682594 (where else)

At least the “head” version was fast and sufficient for me. I am happy.

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The Windows Powershell is quite nice. Of course, now all the Linux users start bitching around, that they always has something like this and that it is nothing special. And no one claims otherwise. But still, the PowerShell is nice and I enjoy it. 🙂

Like today: I needed a simple hex dump of a file:

PS >  $str = ""; $cnt = 0; get-content -encoding byte C:\pfad\zur\Datei.txt | foreach-object { $str += (" {0:x2}" -f $_); if ($cnt++ -eq 7) { $cnt = 0; $str += "`n"; } }; write-host $str

It’s elegance is limited, that I will admit, however, I does it’s job. And, somehow, it is quite nice …

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