Previously, I wrote about using one global msbuild xml file to override nuget package content for local development. While this does work, it comes with a warning if multiple packages use this mechanism:

***Test\packages\***.0.7.1-prerelease-\build\native\***.targets(7,5):
warning MSB4011: "***Test\packagesoverride.xml.user" cannot be imported again. It was already imported at "***Test\packages\***.0.7.1-prerelease-\build\native\***.targets (6,3)".
This is most likely a build authoring error. This subsequent import will be ignored. [***Test\***Test.vcxproj]

While this is not realy a problem, it is a warning. And I don’t like warning. I like my projects to build entirly without warnings.

A soltion for this comes from classic c++ programming: use an include guard. These are the changes required:

The packagesoverride.xml.user must define a default variable. I named it HAS_packagesoverride:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Project ToolsVersion="15.0" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003">
  <PropertyGroup>
    <HAS_packagesoverride>True</HAS_packagesoverride>
    <NugetDevPackageTest_testLib_DevDir>C:\Dev\SomeProject\Dir</NugetDevPackageTest_testLib_DevDir>
  </PropertyGroup>
</Project>

And now importing this xml in the nuget packages’ target files can this for this variable to avoid multiple import:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Project ToolsVersion="4.0" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003" InitialTargets="FaroMorfCopySymbols">

  <!-- Import override settings, if they exist -->
  <ImportGroup>
    <Import
      Condition="Exists('$(SolutionDir)packagesoverride.xml.user') and '$(HAS_packagesoverride)' != 'True'"
      Project="$(SolutionDir)packagesoverride.xml.user" />
  </ImportGroup>

<!-- ... -->

 

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Previously, I wrote about using NuGet for software components, which are still in active development. One of the most important factors was the capability to override the nuget package’s content with content fetched from a directory, e.g., a working copy clone. The key element for this was a MSBuild variable NugetDevPackageTest_testLib_DevDir.

The original plan was to edit this variable using a project property page. While having a UI is nice, this has proven not to work on larger projects. The reason is simple: in larger projects, we talk about a vs solution with multiple vc projects, and many of these projects might reference our NuGet package. If we now need to switch to our local directory, we need to adjust the project properties for every project consuming the package. This is tiring and error prone. Forget to adjust just one project and you might end up with inconsistent builds. Therefore, I was seeking a more centralized configuration.

Update 2019-03-02

I updated the code examples to reflect the updates I recently came up with.

Dev. Override – II

The principle idea of having a variable to control the override remains valid. The targets in your nuget might look like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Project ToolsVersion="4.0" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003">

  <!-- ... -->

  <!-- Compiler settings: defines and includes -->
  <ItemDefinitionGroup Condition="'$(NugetDevPackageTest_testLib_DevDir)' == ''">
    <ClCompile>
      <PreprocessorDefinitions>HAS_NUGETDEVPACKAGETEST_TESTLIB;%(PreprocessorDefinitions)</PreprocessorDefinitions>
      <AdditionalIncludeDirectories>$(MSBuildThisFileDirectory)include\;%(AdditionalIncludeDirectories)</AdditionalIncludeDirectories>
    </ClCompile>
  </ItemDefinitionGroup>
  <ItemDefinitionGroup Condition="'$(NugetDevPackageTest_testLib_DevDir)' != ''">
    <ClCompile>
      <PreprocessorDefinitions>HAS_NUGETDEVPACKAGETEST_TESTLIB;HAS_NUGETDEVPACKAGETEST_TESTLIB_DEVDIR;%(PreprocessorDefinitions)</PreprocessorDefinitions>
      <AdditionalIncludeDirectories>$(NugetDevPackageTest_testLib_DevDir)\Project\include\;%(AdditionalIncludeDirectories)</AdditionalIncludeDirectories>
    </ClCompile>
  </ItemDefinitionGroup>

  <!-- ... -->

</Project>

The obvious question is the definition of our DevDir variable.

For this is propose a central msbuild xml at the level of the vs solution!

We include it in our targets file, right after the root Project tag starts:

<ImportGroup>
  <Import Project="$(SolutionDir)packagesoverride.xml.user" Condition="Exists('$(SolutionDir)packagesoverride.xml.user') and '$(HAS_packagesoverride)' != 'True'" />
</ImportGroup>

This line imports the msbuild xml file, if it exists. Notice, how the file name is generic and not related to our specific package. This is because multiple nuget packages can share this file!

The content of this central configuration is very simple:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Project ToolsVersion="15.0" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003">
  <PropertyGroup>
    <HAS_packagesoverride>True</HAS_packagesoverride>
    <NugetDevPackageTest_testLib_DevDir>C:\Dev\SomeProject\Dir</NugetDevPackageTest_testLib_DevDir>
  </PropertyGroup>
</Project>

Now if you need to override a nuget package for your whole solution, just create this file!

Drawback 1: If the file did not exist previously, an you create it, then you need to rebuild all projects with nugets referencing this package. Because they might be affected by this file.

However, once the file does exist, changes to the file are currectly and automatically detected by visual studio, and build operations are correctly triggered in the affected projects. So, it might be a nice idea to keep a file with an empty property group in place, just in case.

If you need to override multiple nugets at once, just add multiple entries into this one property group.

Drawback 2: There is no UI. So you need to edit it in your favorite text editor, meaning, you are prone to all typing errors you can come up with.

All in all, I believe this central file for the nuget override configuration is an improvement.

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GLM is a nice, lean, good math library for OpenGL. It’s header-only. Does a NuGet package make sense anyway? I say “Yes”. The simple usage and the clean versioning make up for the minimal additional overhead.

I am now also helping in maintaining the GLM Nuget package. And I updated the package to version 0.9.9.

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Hi, I updated the NuGet package for GLFW once again.

The content is basically identical to before, but there are three important changes:

  • The version number now uses four numbers: 3.2.1.5. The fourth number is a package-build number which I can increase, even though I pack the same version of GLFW. This finally allows me to get rid of the “pre-release” flags I previously used for the VS 2017 repackage.
  • I no longer use CoApp. CoApp is dead and not really missed. At work I started writing .nuspec and .targets files manually, and this is neither very hard, nor very much work.
  • Last but not least, I added some properties, available within the Visual Studio GUI as part of the properties pages. There you can now enforce configuration and toolset version of the library you want to use. This is especially useful if you have special configurations which cannot automatically mapped by NuGet. You can now map those manually, at least.

Of course, everything is available on bitbucket.

Now, I am waiting for the next version of GLFW to be published.

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And now there is Voro++ on Nuget. Voro++ is a library and utility, written by Chris Rycroft (with Applied Mathematics in Harvard SEAS) for compute Voronoi cells für 3D data. I use his lib actually to compute natural neighbors in my particle data sets. For me, Voro++ is better suited than other libs, like e.g. qhull, for several reasons: it is easy to use, streamlined for 3D, and natively support periodic boundary conditions. The single drawback I found, there are no official binary releases for Windows. And that is why I started this nuget package.

The library’s source code is rather clean and compiles without problem in Visual Studio. So all I did, was compiling the static library for the four latest Visual C++ versions, and I put the nuget package together. My Visual Studio solution and project files are also publicly available on bitbucket: https://bitbucket.org/sgrottel_nuget/voro

The package contains the static library, the header files, some files from the documentation, and the command line tool built with MSVC 2015. If you only want the command line tool and don’t care for the lib, simply download the nuget package, unzip it (yes, nuget packages are basically zip files), and you’ll find the exe in the tools subdirectory. For the full documentation of the library, go the Chris’ website or the original source code package.

What I didn’t include in the nuget package are any samples. But compiling them for yourself is as simple as it could be:

1. start a new C++ console application in visual studio.

Be sure to deactivate precompiled headers and to make the project empty.

voromsvc01

2. drag-drop-add any cc-example.

Just use any file from Chris’ source code package into the project.

voromsvc02

3. Add the voroplusplus nuget package.

voromsvc03

4. And you’re done! Compile it and run it by a push of a button.

Have fun!

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I adopted yet another nuget package: Lua

The reason, of course, is MegaMol, more precisely an upcoming addition to MegaMol enabling scripting of all internal management functions. After some thought, we opted for Lua as scripting language in our project. Building Lua is no big deal. But I also wanted the build process of MegaMol as a whole to be a simple as possible. On Windows this calls for nuget.

Of course, the nuget package already existed, but it was old. Instead of just starting another one, I contacted the original authors of the coapp team. They were happy to grant me access to the package, so that I could update to the new binaries. I will try my best to keep it up to date and to support many Visual Studio versions and settings.

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